Twilio Experimentation

I just configured this phone number: (864) 778-2657.
It might be handy if somebody requests your number and you don’t feel like giving it to them.

Alternatively, perhaps you’re standing at a piano and you’re wondering if it’s tuned to A440?
Don’t have a tuning fork? I made you one. Call (207) 306-A440.

I recently discovered Twilio. I’ve been “out” of technology for a few years now, and so on my reentry I’ve found the world has changed in tremendously exciting ways!

Twilio provides the telephone numbers and service behind many of the businesses you talk to. When companies send you marketing texts, or when websites confirm that it was actually you logging in, they’re very often using Twilio. When you call a number and hear a menu, you’re often actually interacting with Twilio.

With Twilio, you can purchase a number for $1 a month. Any number, even your number if you choose to port it over from your service provider. At that point, you pay a fraction of a penny per minute of voice, per text message, and per fax (if you choose to use such archaic communication services).

Twilio has a lot to offer you, both when it comes to business and when it comes to privacy. However, it’s also quite complicated to use, and a background in programming is helpful. If you’d like the privacy advantages without the difficulty, consider using MySudo. MySudo will allow you to create up to nine different unique phone numbers, and will allow you to pick where they’re geographically located. These phone numbers are anonymous, and can place calls and send and receive text messages.

Although it does have a learning curve, Twilio gives you an extraordinary amount of flexibility, including the ability to write software that sends and receives calls and texts. You can sit at your laptop with 20 different unique numbers, including your own old AT&T or Verizon number. You can place calls, send texts, or create automated menus for any quantity of different phone numbers you would like, at minimal expense. Your cellphone can use these numbers too.

Go ahead. Give those numbers up top a ring!

I have plans to integrate this with radio for long-distance communication from wilderness areas using my car as a mobile relay station. More to follow on this!

Here is the code used in TwiML for the A440 phone number:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Response>
  <Say>This is an A 440 hertz tone courtesy of Alex's Piano Service</Say>
  <Play>https://www.alexanderpeppe.com/440.mp3</Play>
  <Say>This is an A 440 hertz tone courtesy of Alex's Piano Service</Say>
  <Play>https://www.alexanderpeppe.com/440.mp3</Play>
  <Say>This is an A 440 hertz tone courtesy of Alex's Piano Service</Say>
  <Play>https://www.alexanderpeppe.com/440.mp3</Play>
  <Say>This is an A 440 hertz tone courtesy of Alex's Piano Service</Say>
  <Play>https://www.alexanderpeppe.com/440.mp3</Play>
  <Say>This is an A 440 hertz tone courtesy of Alex's Piano Service</Say>
  <Play>https://www.alexanderpeppe.com/440.mp3</Play>
</Response>

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